Where they are now?

Where are they now? Reflections, Connections, and Why Internships are Worth It.

By Maggie North

What do a Gallery Coordinator, an Advertising Creative Specialist, a Curator, and a Nurse have in common? Bert Gallery, of course!

After catching up with four Bert Gallery Interns via this blog, this week’s installment of Where Are They Now? is dedicated to reflection. Mike, Liz, Mary, and Allison all enrolled in Providence College, found love in Art or Art History, and found their way to Bert Gallery. Parallels found in their different stories point to the importance of taking on an internship as student, even when coursework and the lure of free time are tempting alternatives.

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Cathy @ 1:00 pm

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Where Are They Now? Introducing Allison Hermann

By Maggie North

Meet Allison Hermann, a Pediatric Intensive Care Nurse and an Art History major from PC’s class of 2007.

During her time at Providence College, Allison would never have guessed that she’d end up in the healthcare setting. Allison, who studied art history, works in pediatric care today but has fond memories of her professors and art history classes. She recalls being enthused by a certain sparkle in Dr. Alice Beckwith’s eyes, which “solidified a love for both art and learning.” She also recalls how Dr. Deborah Johnson challenged her analytical abilities and encouraged her to explore multiple, diverse perspectives. An illness in Allison’s family is what lead her to nursing, but the skills and values she carried have afforded her a broad perspective, the need to ask questions, explore avenues, and to give back with every step of the way. (more…)

Cathy @ 1:00 pm

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Where Are They Now? Mary Tinti

Where are they now?
Talking with Mary Tinti, Curator at the Fitchburg Art Museum and 2000 graduate with a dual major in Art History and Humanities


What was your most unexpected learning experience during your time at Bert Gallery?
I vividly remember being asked to go through a random box of James Drummond Herbert sketches and artist materials. The goal was to separate out the trash from the treasure. I was so naïve at the time, I didn’t realize that Herbert’s pencil drawings on sketchbook paper should not be put in the trash pile! I mistakenly thought these studies – lovely though they were – simply were like “first drafts” that naturally would get tossed once the real paintings were complete. Cathy laughed when she saw my piles and patiently, graciously taught me that the marks of an artist, no matter how preliminary, were creative gestures to be cherished and shared.

What were your favorite and your least favorite part of the internship?
My favorite part of the internship was chatting with the people who came through the door….answering questions about the art on display or the artists represented by the gallery. My least favorite part? I can’t really think of one. Even if you weren’t thrilled to be doing something, you likely weren’t doing it for that long before you were on to the next cool project.

Who was your best-loved PC professor and why?
Each of the professors in the Art History Department was very good to me and I learned so much about art and life from them all. But Dr. Deborah Johnson most directly shaped my thinking and personal development at the time, and continues to be a much-admired mentor and friend.

In college, who was your most admired artist or work of art? Who is your favorite artist or work of art now?
In my early years in the art history department, I remember being obsessed with Turner’s The Slave Ship (1840), contemporary artist Liza Lou, Italian artist Alighiero e Boetti, as well as anything related to the work of Jackson Pollock. There will always be a special place in my heart for those artists/works that first spoke to me during my art historical journey at PC. Today, I find that my favorite artists are too many to name, too diverse in style to put in just one category. At FAM, I have the great fortune of working with immensely talented contemporary artists in New England – each of whom becomes my new favorite as we work together towards an exhibition.

Five years from now, Mary looks forward to having helped transform the Fitchburg Art Museum into a vibrant community art museum and a sought-out space for innovative New England contemporary art. We must also congratulate Mary on her recent promotion from Associate Curator to Curator!

Cathy @ 1:00 pm

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Where Are They Now? Introducing Mary Tinti

By Maggie North

Meet Mary Tinti, Curator at the Fitchburg Art Museum and an Art History and Humanities dual major from PC’s class of 2000.

Few people turn their passions into careers as readily, adamantly, and kindly as Mary Tinti has. Space geeks who become astronauts and animal lovers who grow up to become veterinarians fall into this category, as do art history lovers who become curators.

In her interview, Mary described how working with Cathy at Bert Gallery set a certain standard for mentorship and leadership, which she now aims to emulate. I know, first hand, that Mary has met the standard that Cathy set. During my time at PC, Mary acted as an excellent mentor by offering thoughtful and constructive advice on a draft of my thesis. At the time, I had no idea that Mary had, too, received Cathy’s kind guidance. It’s a circle of support that I also hope to pay forward someday. Although Mary’s path lead to museum work instead of gallery work, she does much of the same research, interpretation, and show-shaping that she once enjoyed at Bert Gallery. Certainly, she allowed her interest in contemporary art and ability to make connections with people drive her through a job as registrar of an NYC gallery, graduate school, teaching, internships, fellowships and more. Mary’s words of advice for current students?

Be nice, work hard, and stay in touch. Every great professional experience I’ve ever had was the result of a mentor or colleague putting in a good word for me, or making an important connection on my behalf – something especially true in the arts. Cathy Bert and Deborah Johnson started that trend in my career, and I will be forever grateful for their guidance, their recommendations, and their always being excited to hear from this former student/intern – no matter how much time has past between conversations

Next week, learn more about Mary then, now, and in-between!

Cathy @ 1:00 pm

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Where Are They Now? Liz Chapin

Where are they now?
Interview with Liz Chapin, Advertising Creative Specialist at TripAdvisor and 2009 Studio Art graduate.



What was your most unexpected learning experience during your time at Bert Gallery?

I truly never realized the amount of time and planning that is required to coordinate even a small exhibit. I think a lot of people actually have no concept about the pre-planning phase for exhibits in both galleries and museums.

Did this internship impact your career choices or your artistic decisions?
Working in the gallery certainly impacted my career path after college, although not quite in the way I had expected. After graduating, I spent about a year working at the Institute of Contemporary Art while simultaneously completing another internship at Pucker Gallery in Boston. I loved being around art and artists but I felt like the work I was doing wasn’t particularly creative. While interning at Bert Gallery, I loved creating catalogs to accompany the exhibits. So, in 2010 I enrolled in the Graphic Design Certificate program at MassArt and have been working in that field since the spring of 2011.

In college, who was your most admired artist or work of art? Who is your favorite artist or work of art now?
For my senior thesis show I painted a series of portraits of the people in my life and was very inspired by the work of Alice Neel. She remains one of my favorite painters. Working at the Institute of Contemporary Art after college exposed me to a lot of contemporary artists and to art forms I knew little about previously. In particular, I loved the exhibit of Tara Donovan installations and would advise everyone to see her work if given the chance. You would never imagine that Styrofoam cups could look so beautiful.

Do you have any advice for current PC art or art history majors?
There are a lot more creative careers out there than people think! When I graduated in 2009 the unemployment rate was extraordinarily high and people all over the internet were publishing articles saying that everyone with a degree in humanities had made a huge mistake. It took some time before I figured out exactly what I wanted to do with my art education but I’m happy to say that I’ve found a job that allows me to be creative everyday. Though I’m working in a digital media now, my work is certainly informed by my background in fine arts. Don’t be discouraged!

In five years, Liz sees herself continuing to enjoy working in interaction design, and hopes to be doing some art direction!

 

Cathy @ 8:40 pm

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